BOOK REVIEW: Crossings

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” column_margin=”default” column_direction=”default” column_direction_tablet=”default” column_direction_phone=”default” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” row_border_radius=”none” row_border_radius_applies=”bg” overlay_strength=”0.3″ gradient_direction=”left_to_right” shape_divider_position=”bottom” bg_image_animation=”none”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_tablet=”inherit” column_padding_phone=”inherit” column_padding_position=”all” column_element_spacing=”default” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” column_link_target=”_self” gradient_direction=”left_to_right” overlay_strength=”0.3″ width=”1/1″ tablet_width_inherit=”default” tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” bg_image_animation=”none” border_type=”simple” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]In the hiustenlahto introduction to her book Crossings: A Bald Asian American Woman Scholar’s Ventures Through Life, Death, Cancer & Motherhood (Not Necessarily in that Order), Latter-day Saint author Melissa Inouye writes: “It turns out that all of us can and should find ourselves, and Christ, at the margins.” A collection of letters, essays, and drawings, Crossings offers a moving and insightful response to the call for unity of heart and mind issued by the Lord in Doctrine & Covenants 38:27 in Latter-day Saint scripture. Beautifully written, this is an important book from an equally vital international and female voice in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

Through this book, Inouye aims to encourage readers to bridge the “gaps of space, culture, and generations” that exist between us. While Inouye acknowledges that “fix-it work isn’t very glamorous,” she reminds readers that “it is the work of prophets, disciples, and Christ himself,” and that there is empathy and charity to be had for all when we choose to meet each other in the margins. 

Over the course of the novel, Inouye shares the ways in which her faith has shaped her life–both “at work and at play, as a student and as a teacher, as a child and as a parent, in health and in sickness.” With surprising candour, Inouye does not shy away from the complex history of the Church or the ways in which many members feel alone in their sorrow, loneliness, doubt, or discouragement. ماكينات القمار على الانترنت Instead, she asks readers to remember that “marginality is the purpose of God’s plan of salvation,” and that we are all “aliens, exiles, sojourners far from our spiritual home.” Inouye emphasizes that the purpose of this life is to acknowledge that alienation both in ourselves and others, and to “respond with charity–to seek, receive, and share the pure love of Christ so that we may be one amidst our differences.” 

Crossings is an achingly honest, yet sincerely joyful portrait of nuanced faith. In it, Inouye explores her relationship with the Church in connection to her cultural heritage, scholarship on Chinese history and religious studies, and experiences of motherhood in an international setting. She does not aim to preach or prescribe the Latter-day Saint experience. ربح الاموال Instead, she simply shares the ways in which she has “found the fruits of this life to be worthwhile–costly, to be sure, but also rich and nourishing, a source of deep joy.” 

Both in this book and in her work as the founder of the Global Mormon Studies research community, Inouye broadens the definition of what it means to be a Latter-day Saint woman by offering a global perspective and inviting readers to join her in building “crossings” to bridge the divisions among us. 

Warm and friendly, Melissa Inouye’s voice feels authentic and familiar, and reading Crossings feels like a conversation with an old friend. Her book is an invaluable resource for women of faith everywhere and an inspired and impassioned plea for empathy and love. العب روليت If you’re looking for your new favourite book, you’ve found it. 

This book is in English and available through Deseret Books HERE and Amazon HERE

Contributor: Clare Hamn[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

BOOK REVIEW: The Next Mormons (How Millenials Are Changing the LDS Church)

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” column_margin=”default” column_direction=”default” column_direction_tablet=”default” column_direction_phone=”default” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” row_border_radius=”none” row_border_radius_applies=”bg” overlay_strength=”0.3″ gradient_direction=”left_to_right” shape_divider_position=”bottom” bg_image_animation=”none”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_tablet=”inherit” column_padding_phone=”inherit” column_padding_position=”all” column_element_spacing=”default” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” column_link_target=”_self” gradient_direction=”left_to_right” overlay_strength=”0.3″ width=”1/1″ tablet_width_inherit=”default” tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” bg_image_animation=”none” border_type=”simple” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]In his April 2017 address titled “Songs Sung and Unsung,”  Latter-day Saint leader Jeffrey R. Holland asked listeners to remember that, “it is by divine design that not all the voices in God’s choir are the same.” He goes on to caution members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Church) against “conform[ing] to fictitious stereotypes” and reminds listeners that our Heavenly Father “delights to have us sing in our own voice, not someone else’s.” However, sometimes when it comes to topics that are close to our hearts or families, it can be a struggle to navigate the multitude of voices in the choir. 

One of the most pertinent topics in the Latter-day Saint community today is the generational divide between young and old members of the Church. We each have our own views, shaped by our experiences, but in order to truly love one another and come to appreciate the richness of God’s choir, we must choose to listen to and respect each person’s voice–even if it isn’t in full harmony with our own. روليت عربي

In The Next Mormons, Latter-day Saint author Jana Riess amplifies the voices of four generations of Latter-day Saint members and examines the changing landscape of the Church in America–though many of these trends are represented in European LDS communities as well. Drawing on data from her large-scale national study and in-depth interviews with members of the Church, Riess analyses the religious behaviour of young adult Mormons and finds that while their levels of belief remain strong, their institutional loyalties are less certain than their parents’ and grandparents’.

Throughout the book, Riess explores the tensions between the Church’s strong emphasis on the traditional family and younger members’ more inclusive definition that embraces same-sex couples, women’s equality, and single life. Riess recognises that the world that older members grew up in is not the same one that the younger generations have come to know, and honours the internal struggles they face as they attempt to navigate this generational dissonance. طاولة الروليت  

In The Next Mormons, readers will find a thoughtful collection of stories and insights that paint a moving and informative portrait of “a generation navigating between traditional religion and a rapidly changing culture,” whether that leads them to step away from the Church or honour the nuances of their faith. In doing so, Riess also highlights the need within the Church to extend compassion and understanding to one another in order to bridge this generational divide. سباق الأحصنة  

This book is an invaluable resource for all Latter-day Saints, as it not only amplifies the many diverse voices within our community but also encourages us to love one another–one of God’s greatest commandments.  As Elder Holland reminds us, Christ invites everyone  to “come as you are” and at the end of the day “all God’s critters got a place in the choir.” 

This book is in English and available through Amazon HERE.

 

Contributor: Clare Hamn[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

AS SISTERS IN ZION: Three Must-Reads by Latter-day Saint Women

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” column_margin=”default” column_direction=”default” column_direction_tablet=”default” column_direction_phone=”default” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” row_border_radius=”none” row_border_radius_applies=”bg” overlay_strength=”0.3″ gradient_direction=”left_to_right” shape_divider_position=”bottom” bg_image_animation=”none”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_tablet=”inherit” column_padding_phone=”inherit” column_padding_position=”all” column_element_spacing=”default” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” column_link_target=”_self” gradient_direction=”left_to_right” overlay_strength=”0.3″ width=”1/1″ tablet_width_inherit=”default” tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” bg_image_animation=”none” border_type=”simple” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]Many women who belong to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Church) are starting to share their lives and stories in uplifting, courageous and strengthening ways. Here we highlight three wonderful collections and reflections that will help you get to know women from all over the world and all walks of life. 1xbet موقع

  1. “Women at Church: Magnifying LDS Women’s Local Impact” – Neylan McBaine 
  2. “A Place to Belong: Reflections from Modern Latter-day Saint Women” – Hollie Rhees Fluhman & Camille Fronk Olson 
  3. “The LDS Women Project”

 

1. Women at Church (Neylan McBaine) 

In her 2014 book, Women at Church – Magnifying LDS Women’s Local Impact, New York-raised Neylan McBaine shares from her well of insights on increasing the inclusion of women in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The book was a product of hundreds of interviews McBaine conducted through the Mormon Women Project (see below). It brings to light, in a sensitive yet bold manner, “those who feel unseen, unheard, and unused” and then goes on to guide the reader through concrete and practical steps that can be taken to make the Church a more inclusive place for women. Much has been said about the experiences of women at Church over the past few years, but few writers, if any, have captured the unique challenges associated with it and wrapped them in constructive ideas as McBaine does. This is a book for men and women, leaders and laypeople. If you read just one book on women at Church, make this the one. 

The book is in English and is accessible through: Amazon and Deseret Books.

 

2. A Place to Belong                                                                                                     (edited by Hollie Rhees Fluhman & Camille Fronk Olson)

A Place to Belong – Reflections from Modern Latter-day Saint Women welcomes you into a  community and chorus of beautiful voices belonging to women from around the world. With honesty and vulnerability, 33 women share their thoughts on belonging, faith, and not-so-perfect families in this unique collection. The editors, Fluhman and Olson, hoped to show “​​that there’s more than one way to be a believing and contributing woman in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.” This book proves to be a resounding success on this count. Moreover, they tactfully showcase the duality of tension and complementarity between women’s issues and faith among women in the Church in a way that leaves the reader with greater compassion, understanding and courage. We highly recommend the read and hope to continue to see more diverse and courageous women share their stories in the future! بينجو اون لاين  

The book is in English and is accessible through: Amazon and Deseret Books.

 

3. The Latter-day Saint Women Project

Originally known as the Mormon Women Project, the (now) LDS Women Project was founded by Neylan McBaine in 2009 to challenge and expand the narrative of the stereotypical woman in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. To date, the LDSWP hosts a library of over 250 interviews with women from around the world, including 30 European women ranging from Portuguese Marina Neto reflecting on racial injustice to Icelandic Sveinbjörg Guðmundsdóttir on translating the Book of Mormon into Icelandic. Beyond interviews, the LDSWP now also offers a series of essays, ready-to-grab posts with quotes by Latter-day Saint women, supplements for Sunday School and much more. العاب استراتيجية اون لاين The LDSWP has created a vast and crucially important living reservoir of faith stories and resources for the Latter-day Saint woman.  

The website is in English with many interviews also available in Spanish. 

 

Here is a taste of the contemporary voice resources found in our new Resource Library. Soon we will be adding our own storytelling series of women from across Europe to the collection.  For a look at what we’ll be sharing, click here.

 

Contributor: Louise Paulsen[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]